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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Flex Overheating? Here the Cheapo Fix! Worked for Me anyway.


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3 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Tenspound

Tenspound

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  • Region:U.S. Pacific Coast
  • Location:Rancho Cucamonga
  • Current Vehicle:2009 Flex, 2005 F650

Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:39 PM

This is for a 2009 Flex. I hate electric Fans! Use at ur own risk of course, I'm no expert. Just hate costly stupid design flaws. There is no need for that module except maybe to cut power when key is off. Even then, well just read bellow this worked for me.....

Alright, well I signed up for this forum specifically because of this overheating issue. Here's what I did to avoid the costly repair:

1) I removed the 80 amp fuse ( fans have constant power otherwise you will get shocked if you dont remove it) from fuse box in the engine bay (across form the mounting screw inside fuse box in the lower right hand corner looking at it from the front of the car where the good latch is) check ur fuse layout in owners manual its noted at cooling fan or something. Forget the number off hand. Want to say its in the 20's.

2) I removed the module (one screw bellow the module lower right if your facing engine bay from the front. Its a Phillips screw)

3) with the fuse out, I cut the wires noting which went where and to my knowledge green red is the 12V power black green is the "neutral" for the main lead in.
Red and black wires come from fans.

4) With the fuse out, I tied the red wires together and pig tailed to the green/red then black wires to the black/green. Pig tail just means I tied both red wires together and added a third red wire to that connection so only one wire went to the green/red I stead of trying to tie all together in one shot. Made it much easier. Did the same for black wires from the fan which I pigtailed with a third black then took the pigtail and connected that to the black/ green.

I used number 8 awg wire since its an 80 amp circuit. #8 probably ok #6 would have been better and should be fine strand or electronic wire not electrical if possible. Anyhow. You should get the idea. If not so this to your local handy helper neighbor and he should understand. I just used blue wire nuts. Electrical tape to wrap the connection and then zipped tied the wires to the fan case to secure it from bouncing around.

5) then I installed the 80 amp fuse and crossed my fingers.

Note: the fans have contestant power so be sure everything is connected well and tight before installing fuse. And make sure the fuse is out if you ever need to touch the wires again. You will get a jolt otherwise.

Do all this while engine is cool.

6) start the car, nothing will happen at first and you would think cause you just hard wired it would turn on. But actually the variable speed and heat sensing still works. It goes faster as it heats up and will run after you stop until it cools off enough. I have been removing the fuse just incase it pulls power and drains the battery while I'm not using the car and its ages me stranded. One day I will test it better. I may I stall a cheapo switch that I can just turn on the power to the fans and turn it off when I park it for long periods. If I'm just running in and out then I don't worry about it.

And each fan turned on separately as needed and AC blew colder than ever before. I'm freak'n awesome.

Might not be the clever fix but in a jamb and if Installed with a switch that you can even tie Into ignition power of your so inclined there is really no reason to have that stupid module and it will save you the $600-1k that everyone is complaining about until your ready for it.

Worked for me, I couldn't see myself spending $600-1K for a stupid fan module so I just went for it and it worked.

Ohhh there is a little white wire that come from the main lead as well, not sure what that does I'm gonna play with it soon that might be the off switch when parked. So far it hasn't been any issue and its been about one month. I just taped it up with the rest of the wire all by itself. Other than it sucks to open you hold and remember to remove or install the fuse. I'm just to busy to see if that matters even. With everything working so well I'm inclined to think it will run for 10-15 min after stopping then turn off as temp drops anyway and be fine. It was 105 here last week and it didn't turn on when I Installed fuse and ran inside for 20min so ambient temp doesn't seem to affect it too much at all.

So that's it. Took about an hour cause it was a tight space and not a lot of wire to work with. Make sure if you try it to leave about an inch or so off factory leads for if you ever want to hook up and module again.

No guarantees obviously, not sure if anyone else has tried it and not sure maybe my car will blow up in a couple months. But I have been 6K miles and one month in no problems.

Good Luck!!!

#2 OFFLINE   Waldo

Waldo

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 06:15 AM

I don't get it.  Looking at the wiring diagram, what you've done is truly hard-wired the fans.  The white wire is the input wire from the PCM.  Without that input, there's no way for the fans to know when to turn on.  The module itself is what varies the voltage, so if you've completely bypassed the module, the fans are always getting the same voltage and cannot possibly vary in speed.  How can the fans possibly come on separately when you've literally tied them together?  Also leaving that white wire unconnected should trigger a DTC code in the PCM, which probably should turn on the check engine light.

 

Something about this just doesn't make sense.


Edited by Waldo, 10 September 2013 - 06:38 AM.


#3 OFFLINE   Tenspound

Tenspound

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
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  • Region:U.S. Pacific Coast
  • Location:Rancho Cucamonga
  • Current Vehicle:2009 Flex, 2005 F650

Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:24 AM

It works for me, don't care how or why. I don't argue with realities. You can tell me it doesn't work like that according to the diagram. I would tell you my car is working fine shove the diagram. There are people who get things done and those who stare at diagrams and tell you why it won't work.

Practical application of experience beats book knowledge all day everyday. Diagrams are for philophophers who have their parts to play. They don't do so well when the cars overheated in the middle of the desert, but that's what AAA for.

Use it or don't. It work totally brilliantly for me. I know enough about electronics that I have a very decent understanding of where demand is controled from. I imagine that the amperage and range of the amperage are more the issue than voltage and that one fan is set at a different amperage range period.

But honestly I don't care car works don't care why, do what you will. I could comain about fords stupidity on the electric fan or cost of part but I would rather have a full and complete solution for $5 and 1hrs work.

#4 OFFLINE   Waldo

Waldo

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:22 AM

Well on other thing to keep in mind is that module contains the overload protection for the circuit.  If for some reason a fan gets bound up, either a seized bearing or something stuck in a blade, the module is what turns off the power and prevents the entire thing from catching on fire.








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