Jump to content

Custom Search





Welcome to the Ford Flex Forum


Sign In  Log in with Facebook

Create Account
Welcome to the Ford Flex Forum. Like most online communities, you must register to create topics or post in our community - but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of the Ford Flex Forum by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members
  • Create a photo album and post photos. . .more!
Click here to create an account
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Feel Faster?  We're Now on a Dedicated Server!


Photo
- - - - -

Canadian Tire brands


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Corndog

Corndog

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 22 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 December 2008 - 02:45 PM

What is the brand of tires used on the flex in Canada..
18" and 19"

Thx

#2 OFFLINE   NOBLEwolf

NOBLEwolf

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 38 posts

Posted 28 December 2008 - 08:56 PM

What is the brand of tires used on the flex in Canada..
18" and 19"

Thx

as far as what i have seen.....the 19" are hankook & i am certain that the 18" are the same...

#3 OFFLINE   Corndog

Corndog

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 22 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 29 December 2008 - 06:50 AM

as far as what i have seen.....the 19" are hankook & i am certain that the 18" are the same...


Thats what I thought, I saw 2 Flex yesterday and both had goodyears.. I will have to stop by the dealer and see what they have..
I have to waite unitl Feb for mine

#4 OFFLINE   Waldo

Waldo

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 473 posts

Posted 29 December 2008 - 10:07 AM

The 17in and 19in are Hankooks, the 18in and 20in are Goodyear. Same tires in Canada and the US.

#5 OFFLINE   Corndog

Corndog

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 22 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 29 December 2008 - 10:09 AM

The 17in and 19in are Hankooks, the 18in and 20in are Goodyear. Same tires in Canada and the US.


Thanks Waldo

#6 OFFLINE   jackflash

jackflash

    Flex-a-holic

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 215 posts

Posted 30 December 2008 - 09:44 PM

The 17in and 19in are Hankooks, the 18in and 20in are Goodyear. Same tires in Canada and the US.

Thanks for the clarification.

#7 OFFLINE   Jim

Jim

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 34 posts

Posted 01 January 2009 - 08:55 AM

I took a quick look at mine yesterday and they're Goodyears.

#8 OFFLINE   Corndog

Corndog

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 22 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 01 January 2009 - 09:02 AM

I took a quick look at mine yesterday and they're Goodyears.


Jim I am assuming you have the 18"

I am no car buff and know nothing about rims etc... but would there be any difference in the ride between 18, 19, 20" rims.

#9 OFFLINE   Jim

Jim

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 34 posts

Posted 01 January 2009 - 10:00 AM

Yes, I'm riding on 18's. The two differences with increased size are aesthetics and, i would assume, ground clearance. The ground clearance for snow would be a good thing, however the aesthetic value I consider subjective. I personally like the look of the 18's on the vehicle.

#10 OFFLINE   Corndog

Corndog

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 22 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 01 January 2009 - 10:30 AM

Yes, I'm riding on 18's. The two differences with increased size are aesthetics and, i would assume, ground clearance. The ground clearance for snow would be a good thing, however the aesthetic value I consider subjective. I personally like the look of the 18's on the vehicle.


Hi Jim,
Thx. After asking that question I did a little search and some reading..

I will paste the info from this link here.. http://www.funadvice...anging_rim_size

Question asked
Does changing out the stock rims on my car for bigger rims have an effect on anything? (suspension, gas mileage, etc.)



Answer
You don't say what size of rims and tires you have now. You speedometer is calibrated for a particular diameter of tire. If you go up one size of rim many times you can fit a wider and lower aspect tire to end up with the same or nearly the same diameter. Going with a larger rim and a lower wider tire is called "plus" sizing.

There are a number of reasons people go with plus sizing. Wheels look better than tires so most people think that larger wheels look better. Shorter sidewalls are also stiffer so they can improve handling.

Most of the larger aftermarket wheels are very heavy. They may look cool but the extra weight is what auto enthusiasts call "unsprung weight." Unsprung wieght is bad for handling, acceleration, and braking. If you go with a heavy aftermarket wheel you are unlikely to improve your car's handling. If you just want your car to look cool than that may be fine with you.

Like I said before shorter sidewalls can be stiffer and improve your car's handling. If you go with a light weight wheel and the combined wheel/tire weight is about the same or less than your old wheel/tire than you may indeed improve your car's handling. Also higher performance tires often only come in low profile sizes so going to a plus size may give you better options in rubber.

There are a few other drawbacks to plus sizing with low profile tires. You have to be more careful about inflaiton. If you don't check your tire pressure for months with high profile tires your tires will get a little soft but no big deal. With low profile tires if you let one get soft you will probably ruin it. Tires that delaminate or wear quickly due to underinflation will not be covered by waranty. Wide tires also get worse traction in the rain where they are more prone to hydroplaning and in snow/ice where the wider patch doesn't dig in as well. Some auto enthusiasts who live in the north keep their OEM rims with winter or all-season tires for the winter and have a Summer set of wheels with low profile three-season tires.

Lets say that your car came with 185/60-14 rims. You could actually go to a wider tire without changing rims. 195/55-14 is pretty close in diameter but gets you a little wider rubber on the road. This is called "plus 0" sizing.

If you see some nice 15" rims you like that fit your car you could run 195/50-15 or 205/50-15; the first is will make your spedo read a little high, the second a little low (about 1 MPH), many new car spedos read a little high already so the larger size might make it more accurate). This is called "plus 1" sizing.

Now you see some really cool 16" rims that fit your car that you can't live without. With these wheels you can run 215/40-16 tires. This is called "plus 2" sizing.

Even "plus 3" sizing may be possible. 215/30-17 has about the same diameter as your original tire.

If improving your car's handling is your priority another thing that can improve it is lowering it. Sometimes the combination of lowering your vehicle and going to a wider rim may cause clearance problems. In this situation you have to decide which will improve your handling more.

To improve your car's handling also consider stiffer sway bars for flatter cornering and adjustable shocks that you can fine-tune to your liking. Even something as small as replacing soft rubber bushings with stiffer urethane ones can improve your car's handling. If your car is popular among tuners you should be able to find information about what upgrades provide the best bang for the buck.

#11 OFFLINE   NOBLEwolf

NOBLEwolf

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 38 posts

Posted 01 January 2009 - 11:02 AM

Hi Jim,
Thx. After asking that question I did a little search and some reading..

I will paste the info from this link here.. http://www.funadvice...anging_rim_size

Question asked
Does changing out the stock rims on my car for bigger rims have an effect on anything? (suspension, gas mileage, etc.)



Answer
You don't say what size of rims and tires you have now. You speedometer is calibrated for a particular diameter of tire. If you go up one size of rim many times you can fit a wider and lower aspect tire to end up with the same or nearly the same diameter. Going with a larger rim and a lower wider tire is called "plus" sizing.

There are a number of reasons people go with plus sizing. Wheels look better than tires so most people think that larger wheels look better. Shorter sidewalls are also stiffer so they can improve handling.

Most of the larger aftermarket wheels are very heavy. They may look cool but the extra weight is what auto enthusiasts call "unsprung weight." Unsprung wieght is bad for handling, acceleration, and braking. If you go with a heavy aftermarket wheel you are unlikely to improve your car's handling. If you just want your car to look cool than that may be fine with you.

Like I said before shorter sidewalls can be stiffer and improve your car's handling. If you go with a light weight wheel and the combined wheel/tire weight is about the same or less than your old wheel/tire than you may indeed improve your car's handling. Also higher performance tires often only come in low profile sizes so going to a plus size may give you better options in rubber.

There are a few other drawbacks to plus sizing with low profile tires. You have to be more careful about inflaiton. If you don't check your tire pressure for months with high profile tires your tires will get a little soft but no big deal. With low profile tires if you let one get soft you will probably ruin it. Tires that delaminate or wear quickly due to underinflation will not be covered by waranty. Wide tires also get worse traction in the rain where they are more prone to hydroplaning and in snow/ice where the wider patch doesn't dig in as well. Some auto enthusiasts who live in the north keep their OEM rims with winter or all-season tires for the winter and have a Summer set of wheels with low profile three-season tires.

Lets say that your car came with 185/60-14 rims. You could actually go to a wider tire without changing rims. 195/55-14 is pretty close in diameter but gets you a little wider rubber on the road. This is called "plus 0" sizing.

If you see some nice 15" rims you like that fit your car you could run 195/50-15 or 205/50-15; the first is will make your spedo read a little high, the second a little low (about 1 MPH), many new car spedos read a little high already so the larger size might make it more accurate). This is called "plus 1" sizing.

Now you see some really cool 16" rims that fit your car that you can't live without. With these wheels you can run 215/40-16 tires. This is called "plus 2" sizing.

Even "plus 3" sizing may be possible. 215/30-17 has about the same diameter as your original tire.

If improving your car's handling is your priority another thing that can improve it is lowering it. Sometimes the combination of lowering your vehicle and going to a wider rim may cause clearance problems. In this situation you have to decide which will improve your handling more.

To improve your car's handling also consider stiffer sway bars for flatter cornering and adjustable shocks that you can fine-tune to your liking. Even something as small as replacing soft rubber bushings with stiffer urethane ones can improve your car's handling. If your car is popular among tuners you should be able to find information about what upgrades provide the best bang for the buck.



Corndog....thanks for that article...it is informative & a good, easy to understand read for those who were not in the know...

#12 OFFLINE   Jim

Jim

    New Flex Member

  • Ford Flex Members
  • 34 posts

Posted 01 January 2009 - 08:00 PM

Sure was. Thanks.






Custom Search




Privacy Policy Terms of Service ·